Health professionals in difficulty

Event Details

Where

Online

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When

Start: Tuesday, 24 November 2020 at 9.00 GMT

End: Tuesday, 24 November 2020 at 10.30 GMT

How can we best support our healthcare force’s mental health?

COVID-19 has placed unprecedented demands on healthcare professionals, and many are experiencing mental health and wellbeing challenges. This webinar provides an overview of the scale of mental health problems in the workforce (pre- and post-COVID) and associated issues such as work-related stress and burnout. Also identified are the occupational, organisational and individual difference factors that underpin the mental health of the workforce and the wider implications for the wellbeing of staff and patients.  Interventions that have the potential to enhance the wellbeing of healthcare staff will be discussed and recommendations for action highlighted.

 

About the speaker

Professor Gail Kinman is Visiting Professor of Occupational Health Psychology at Birkbeck University of London. She is a Chartered Psychologist and a Fellow of the British Psychological Society and the Academy of Social Sciences. Gail has published widely in the field of occupational health psychology, with a particular interest in the wellbeing of people who work in emotionally demanding professions such as health and social care staff, prison officers and teachers.  Her recent work focuses on developing and evaluating multi-level, systemic interventions to enhance resilience and wellbeing. This work is being used to inform wellbeing assessments and a national ‘emotional curriculum’ for health and social care professionals.  Gail has recently been commissioned by bodies such as the Royal College of Nursing Foundation, the Louise Tebboth Foundation and the Society for Occupational Medicine to conduct national reviews of the work-related wellbeing of healthcare professionals.  She is currently working with the British Psychological Society on guidelines to help organisations and individuals manage the demands posed by the COVID-19 pandemic and its aftermath.